Workshop 2015

Workshop 2015

NOVAE Workshop Graphics Overview

NOVAE Workshop Graphics Overview showing Cabled Network (figure 1) and Axial Volcano region (figure 2)

NOVAE Workshop Graphics Overview

NOVAE Workshop Graphics Overview showingCabled network (Figure 1) and Axial Volcano region (Figure 2)

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NOVAE Workshop Graphics Detail

NOVAE Workshop Graphics Detail showing Axial Caldera (Figure 3) and Axial Base (Figure 4)

NOVAE Workshop Graphics Detail

NOVAE Workshop Graphics Detail showing Axial Caldera (Figure 3) and Axial Base (Figure 4)

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Axial Volcano:

Wired and Restless

A Community Gathering to Brainstorm and Plan for the

Upcoming Two Decades of Focus on Axial Volcano Wired

 

April 20-22, 2015, Seattle, WA

Talaris Conference Center

A Convergence of Conditions = A Historic Opportunity

Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge is behaving restlessly and an eruption is imminent. Evidence comes from data showing that the caldera floor is rising about a half meter a year, much faster than expected, and from seismic data showing a dramatic increase in earthquakes at Axial. These data are coming ashore in real time thanks to an electro-optical network of sensors on and near Axial, a component of the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative Cabled Array, also known as the Regional Scale Nodes. In support of NSF, the OOI is managed by the OOI Project Office at the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL).

Installation of the OOI Cabled Array was completed in autumn 2014. There are now 20+ instruments inside the caldera and two instrumented profiler moorings and seafloor sensors at its base, all connected to the Internet. Data have been flowing to the University of Washington since installation and will be available to the community in late spring 2015 through the OOI Cyberinfrastructure. Publicly available seismic data are now streaming to the Incoporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) and as many as 1,000 earthquakes per day have been detected at Axial. (See "An Early Look at the OOI’s Seismic Data from Axial Seamount: Is the Volcano About to Erupt?" in William Wilcock's blog and  "Rapid Reinflation Found at Axial Seamount" on the NOAA/PMEL website. For a continually updated daily histogram of earthquake activity, see Wilcock's blog for "Preliminary Histogram by Day")

This convergence of conditions means that the ocean-ridge community of scientists, educators, and engineers in both industry and academe are in a unique position to utilize this newly installed “Natural Laboratory” to continue identifying novel approaches to long-term, quantitative studies of submarine volcano-hydrothermal systems and their impacts on dynamic overlying marine ecosystems.  

Objective of Gathering: Brainstorm and Develop a Plan

A gathering of researchers and educators to strategically brainstorm and define innovative options for the upcoming two decades of Axial Volcano Wired will be held April 20, 21, 22, 2015 in Seattle. The objective of the meeting is to lay out the paths forward for truly interactive, cross-disciplinary research. The existing sensing system, designed 5 years ago, is utilizing less than 20% of the available bandwidth, which increases opportunities for pursuing bold, next-generation science and education programs associated with an active undersea volcano. 

Specific Workshop 2015 objectives are the following:

  • Review what is known about Axial and other similar systems
  • Explore expected uses of the OOI Cabled Array as configured
  • Develop community consensus regarding a suite of driving scientific questions and hypotheses
  • Move toward consensus on upgrades, additions, or expansions of sensor-robotic arrays required to advance understanding of the processes/impacts of an erupting submarine volcano
  • Discuss technological configurations that can complement and enhance cable-based research objectives - examples might include gliders, AUVs, crawlers, ecogenomic sensors, Argo Floats, both submarine and aerial vehicles, innovative cameras, etc.
  • Lay out a strategy for a significant modeling effort to reveal changes, assimilate data, simulate interacting processes, and reveal unanticipated phenomena to feed back into the observational plans for the overall system
  • Examine educational elements of this powerful new approach to conducting real-time ocean science.
  • A workshop report will capture all deliberations and a summary will be published in EOS. We will be coordinating our efforts with the NSF Ocean Observing Science Committee.

In many ways this April 2015 workshop on Axial is a follow-on to the 2011 Axial Workshop but with one big, and very important, difference: the OOI cabled system is now installed and operating and sending live data to shore. In the coming years, Axial Volcano Wired will be accessible to all via the Internet and will offer a representative view of the linkages among the physical, chemical, and biological processes operative in most basalt-based submarine ridge-crest environments the world over.

Who Should Attend This Workshop

Modelers, marine geophysicists, seismologists, submarine volcanologists, fluid chemists, volatile chemists, physical, chemical, and biological oceanographers, ocean engineers, and ocean-science educators ranging from graduate-student level to mature researchers and professionals. Individuals from both academe and industry are encouraged to consider attending.

How to Apply

Space and funding support are limited. Please submit via email to John Delaney (jdelaney@uw.edu), with a cc to Tracie Hunt (watkins@ocean.washington.ed), the following:

  • short statement of your interest and your expertise with Axial/mid-ocean ridge research
  • need for travel/per diem support. (Young scientists are sprecifically encouraged to participate and the review committee will be somewhat more supportive of your financial needs.)
  • your most challenging scientific issue that could be addressed in the coming decades related to Axial Volcano Wired and/or ridge-crest research and education.  A very preliminary list of questions is posted here.

Logistics: Accomodations and Venue

The workshop will be held at the Talaris Conference Center near the University of Washington. 

A block of 40 rooms will be held until March 27 at the Silver Cloud Inn-University District . The Silver Cloud operates a shuttle to/from Talaris. Group rates, available until March 27, are significantly cheaper ($139/night) than rates after that date ($159-$179). Phone number of the Silver Cloud is 206-526-5200. Please make reservations as early as possible to economize your own budgets.

Supporters (logos and names to come--this is a placeholder)

The following organizations have provided funding support for this workshop: UW, Kaplan Foundation, Moore Foundation, U New Hampshire (UNH Logo, and School of Marine Science & Ocean Engineering - according to Larry Mayer), WHOI

 

 

Workshop 2015

Workshop 2015

Axial Volcano:

Wired and Restless

A Community Gathering to Brainstorm and Plan for the

Upcoming Two Decades of Focus on Axial Volcano Wired

 

April 20-22, 2015, Seattle, WA

Talaris Conference Center

A Convergence of Conditions = A Historic Opportunity

Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge is behaving restlessly and an eruption is imminent. Evidence comes from data showing that the caldera floor is rising about a half meter a year, much faster than expected, and from seismic data showing a dramatic increase in earthquakes at Axial. These data are coming ashore in real time thanks to an electro-optical network of sensors on and near Axial, a component of the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative Cabled Array, also known as the Regional Scale Nodes. In support of NSF, the OOI is managed by the OOI Project Office at the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL).

Installation of the OOI Cabled Array was completed in autumn 2014. There are now 20+ instruments inside the caldera and two instrumented profiler moorings and seafloor sensors at its base, all connected to the Internet. Data have been flowing to the University of Washington since installation and will be available to the community in late spring 2015 through the OOI Cyberinfrastructure. Publicly available seismic data are now streaming to the Incoporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) and as many as 1,000 earthquakes per day have been detected at Axial. (See "An Early Look at the OOI’s Seismic Data from Axial Seamount: Is the Volcano About to Erupt?" in William Wilcock's blog and  "Rapid Reinflation Found at Axial Seamount" on the NOAA/PMEL website. For a continually updated daily histogram of earthquake activity, see Wilcock's blog for "Preliminary Histogram by Day")

This convergence of conditions means that the ocean-ridge community of scientists, educators, and engineers in both industry and academe are in a unique position to utilize this newly installed “Natural Laboratory” to continue identifying novel approaches to long-term, quantitative studies of submarine volcano-hydrothermal systems and their impacts on dynamic overlying marine ecosystems.  

Objective of Gathering: Brainstorm and Develop a Plan

A gathering of researchers and educators to strategically brainstorm and define innovative options for the upcoming two decades of Axial Volcano Wired will be held April 20, 21, 22, 2015 in Seattle. The objective of the meeting is to lay out the paths forward for truly interactive, cross-disciplinary research. The existing sensing system, designed 5 years ago, is utilizing less than 20% of the available bandwidth, which increases opportunities for pursuing bold, next-generation science and education programs associated with an active undersea volcano. 

Specific Workshop 2015 objectives are the following:

  • Review what is known about Axial and other similar systems
  • Explore expected uses of the OOI Cabled Array as configured
  • Develop community consensus regarding a suite of driving scientific questions and hypotheses
  • Move toward consensus on upgrades, additions, or expansions of sensor-robotic arrays required to advance understanding of the processes/impacts of an erupting submarine volcano
  • Discuss technological configurations that can complement and enhance cable-based research objectives - examples might include gliders, AUVs, crawlers, ecogenomic sensors, Argo Floats, both submarine and aerial vehicles, innovative cameras, etc.
  • Lay out a strategy for a significant modeling effort to reveal changes, assimilate data, simulate interacting processes, and reveal unanticipated phenomena to feed back into the observational plans for the overall system
  • Examine educational elements of this powerful new approach to conducting real-time ocean science.
  • A workshop report will capture all deliberations and a summary will be published in EOS. We will be coordinating our efforts with the NSF Ocean Observing Science Committee.

In many ways this April 2015 workshop on Axial is a follow-on to the 2011 Axial Workshop but with one big, and very important, difference: the OOI cabled system is now installed and operating and sending live data to shore. In the coming years, Axial Volcano Wired will be accessible to all via the Internet and will offer a representative view of the linkages among the physical, chemical, and biological processes operative in most basalt-based submarine ridge-crest environments the world over.

Who Should Attend This Workshop

Modelers, marine geophysicists, seismologists, submarine volcanologists, fluid chemists, volatile chemists, physical, chemical, and biological oceanographers, ocean engineers, and ocean-science educators ranging from graduate-student level to mature researchers and professionals. Individuals from both academe and industry are encouraged to consider attending.

How to Apply

Space and funding support are limited. Please submit via email to John Delaney (jdelaney@uw.edu), with a cc to Tracie Hunt (watkins@ocean.washington.ed), the following:

  • short statement of your interest and your expertise with Axial/mid-ocean ridge research
  • need for travel/per diem support. (Young scientists are sprecifically encouraged to participate and the review committee will be somewhat more supportive of your financial needs.)
  • your most challenging scientific issue that could be addressed in the coming decades related to Axial Volcano Wired and/or ridge-crest research and education.  A very preliminary list of questions is posted here.

Logistics: Accomodations and Venue

The workshop will be held at the Talaris Conference Center near the University of Washington. 

A block of 40 rooms will be held until March 27 at the Silver Cloud Inn-University District . The Silver Cloud operates a shuttle to/from Talaris. Group rates, available until March 27, are significantly cheaper ($139/night) than rates after that date ($159-$179). Phone number of the Silver Cloud is 206-526-5200. Please make reservations as early as possible to economize your own budgets.

Supporters (logos and names to come--this is a placeholder)

The following organizations have provided funding support for this workshop: UW, Kaplan Foundation, Moore Foundation, U New Hampshire (UNH Logo, and School of Marine Science & Ocean Engineering - according to Larry Mayer), WHOI

 

 

NOVAE Workshop Graphics Overview

NOVAE Workshop Graphics Overview showing Cabled Network (figure 1) and Axial Volcano region (figure 2)

NOVAE Workshop Graphics Overview

NOVAE Workshop Graphics Overview showingCabled network (Figure 1) and Axial Volcano region (Figure 2)

×
NOVAE Workshop Graphics Detail

NOVAE Workshop Graphics Detail showing Axial Caldera (Figure 3) and Axial Base (Figure 4)

NOVAE Workshop Graphics Detail

NOVAE Workshop Graphics Detail showing Axial Caldera (Figure 3) and Axial Base (Figure 4)

×